High-net-worth millennials want to change the world.

High-net-worth millennials want to change the world.

Impact investing is shaping up to be their method of choice.

By Alice Skipton

Comprised of around 75 million people, millennials are the largest generation in the United States to date, outnumbering baby boomers. Now that this cohort is coming of age, it’s becoming clear that this group will wield large influence on the way we invest, do business, solve social problems and take care of the environment.

Will the traditional risk and return model of investing solely for profit one day be outdated?

Will the traditional risk and return model of investing solely for profit one day be outdated?

The father of impact investing, Sir Ronald Cohen, would certainly say yes.

By Alice Skipton

The shift to impact investing is already well underway among the world’s wealthiest investors and philanthropists. Daily headlines chart the progress and partnerships by such leaders as Pierre Omidyar, the Ford Foundation, Jeff Skoll, and Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg.

These super-rich families are investing their fortunes to help others

These super-rich families are investing their fortunes to help others

Some of world's richest families have signed up to a pact: They will invest parts of their vast fortunes in ways that improve the lives of others.

By Katy Scott on August 23, 2017

Read the original article here on CNN Money

The group, which calls itself The ImPact, has plenty of billionaire street cred: It's the brainchild of Justin Rockefeller (a great-great grandson of John D. Rockefeller) and Josh Cohen (CIO of Tyden Ventures).

As Wealthy Millennials Take Control Of Family Fortunes, Impact Investing Is Set For A Big Boost

As Wealthy Millennials Take Control Of Family Fortunes, Impact Investing Is Set For A Big Boost

More than a quarter of ultra-net-worth “family offices” are now putting money into social and environmental areas–and that number is rising.

By Ben Schiller on September 15, 2017

Read the original article here on Fast Company

The world’s richest families are increasingly investing their money in good causes, giving a boost to the growing, if still challenged, impact investing space. More than a quarter (28%) of ultra-net-worth “family offices” are now putting money into social and environmental areas. And, as younger generations take the reins, that percentage is likely to rise significantly in the years ahead.

i(x) investments taps Ex-U.S. Treasury Deputy Secretary for board

i(x) investments taps Ex-U.S. Treasury Deputy Secretary for board

Sarah Bloom Raskin joins board of impact investing firm

By Dennis Price on August 14, 2017 

Read original article here on ImpactAlpha

The impact investment firm i(x) investments, known for its structure as a permanent holding company, has appointed Sarah Bloom Raskin to its Board of Directors.

The multi-strategy social impact investment firm, i(x) investments, appoints Sarah Bloom Raskin to its Board of Directors. The former Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Treasury (2014 to 2017) —and the first women to serve in that role— notes that "social, economic, and environmental progress will be the baseline return on our investments.”

Single-Family Offices Are Increasingly Exploring New Investment Opportunities

Single-Family Offices Are Increasingly Exploring New Investment Opportunities

By Russ Alan Prince on October 9, 2017

Read the original article here on Forbes 

A growing percentage of single-family offices are looking for investments that are not correlated to the “traditional” markets. According to Angelo Robles, founder and CEO of the Family Office Association, “Very often, single-family offices represent the ‘smart money.’ They have their hands on the pulse of the investment community and are always seeking high-quality opportunities. Increasingly, single-family offices are identifying places to put their monies that can do well no matter which direction the markets go.”